HOW DIFFERENT GENERATION RESPONDING TO COVID-19

And how are people of various ages adapting to the pandemic and dealing with what’s going on in the world?

Although certain age groups may be less vulnerable to the health effects of COVID-19, no demographic has a zero risk of contracting COVID-19, and the global pandemic affects all ages and all walks of life. However, reports suggest that there are generational differences in how people respond to this public health crisis.

Boomers -is a term used to describe a person who was born between 1946 and 1964. 

Anybody born between 1981 and 1996 (aged 23 to 38 in 2019) is considered a millennial, and anyone born from 1997 onwards is considered a millennial. Anyone born between 1981 and 1996 (aged 23 to 38 in 2019) is considered a millennial.

News reports suggest a “millennial vs. boomer” divide, implying that boomers: are those who take things seriously while millennials: are out partying, but this is likely to result from a misapprehension of the actual ages of different generations. The youngest millennials are now 24, while the oldest of the Z generation is just 23. Media reports indicate a “millennial vs boomer” split, suggesting that boomers: are those that take life seriously when millennials: are out partying, although that actually stems from a misunderstanding of the real ages of various generations. The youngest millennials are now 24, and the oldest of the Z generation is only 23.

A Harris poll on 2,000 adults published March 13 found 77% of adults over 65 and 67% of millennials (those born between 1981 and 1996) said they’re “unlikely” to catch the virus, which has infected at least 189,000 people around the globe.

The Boomer Generation

Boomers, raised in an age of post-war optimism, have had a lot of exposure over the years. Wars, social change, political upheaval, and more have survived. That may be why they are always seen as less worried about the pandemic than their children and grandchildren think they should be. Younger generations may be annoyed by this, but many boomers may feel like they have been through enough and are capable of taking care of themselves.

Health

Older adults over 65 years of age are at the greatest risk of developing more serious complications from COVID-19. In the U.S., 8 out of 10 COVID-19 associated deaths occurred among adults 65 years of age and older. As follows, there are no more differences in the number in India. But the death rate is still lower than the other.

Family

While boomers may be less concerned about the virus themselves, they may be concerned about the health and well-being of their children and grandchildren. 

Finances 

Older adults may be less concerned about their work situation, often because they have retired or are getting closer to retirement. This doesn’t mean that they’re not worried about the economic consequences of the pandemic, including how their own children and grandchildren deal with it.

Millennials

For older millennials, this is their second time to face a major financial crisis. Like Gen X, they ‘re worried about their older relatives, finances, and careers. Those with young children are also worried about caring for their children, often while trying to work from home. For older millennials, this is their second time to face a major financial crisis. Like Gen X, they ‘re worried about their older relatives, finances, and careers. Those with young children are also worried about caring for their children, often while trying to work from home.

Concerns millennials are dealing with include:

Concern for Parents

In what feels like a strange role reversal, many millennials have found themselves lecturing their parents for not taking social distancing seriously enough.

Family

School closures mean some millennial parents are trying to juggle their own telecommute duties with the role of stand-in teacher for kids trying to complete classwork online.

Finances

One report found that 47% of millennials were scaling back their spending in light of the pandemic.

Description: FinancesPic courtesy: www.rawpixel.com

Health

While the risk of complications in this age group tends to be relatively low, it is important to remember that everyone is at some risk, particularly those with certain health conditions and that the risk of complications increases as people age. Many people are also struggling with job losses and the resulting loss of health insurance. While the risk of complications in this age group tends to be relatively low, it is important to remember that everyone is at some risk, particularly those with certain health conditions and that the risk of complications increases as people age. Many people are also struggling with job losses and the resulting loss of health insurance.

“Millennials are not out of partying,” Mairead McArdle, a reporter for the National Review, said in a tweet. “We and our anxiety issues keep working from home, watching Hulu, and yelling at our parents not to go outside. It’s Gen Z you want. “Millennials are not out partying,” Mairead McArdle, a writer for the National Review, said in a tweet. “We and our anxiety issues keep working from home, watching Hulu, and yelling at our parents not to go outside. It is Gen Z that you like.”

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